Thursday Doors – Notre Dame, Paris

Notre Dame DoorsThis is the Portal of the Last Judgement at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Probably one of the most famous cathedrals in the world, construction was started in 1163 and it opened to the public in 1345. Notre Dame is a marvel of gothic architecture, filled with detail inside and out – these doors are just one example. I particularly love the curling hinges and the way they are almost like lace set against the wood.

There are actually three sets of doors on the front of the building – the Portal of the Virgin, the Portal of the Last Judgement and the Portal of St Anne. When you visit, they bring you in through the left hand set (the Virgin) and you exit through the right hand side (St Anne), having completed a circuit of the cathedral. We visited on a bitterly cold day, just after New Year, yet the cathedral was still full of visitors, the Nativity a gleaming frosty display, candles lighting up chapel ceilings painted with stars.

Notre Dame InteriorI took this quick photo looking down the central nave- it is a bit blurry, as I’m not sure I was supposed to be taking photos inside. However, you can see the rose window and get a sense of the columns and grandeur. You’ll also notice a whole lot of orbs floating around. My daughter took another photo from lower down (she was four at the time) and there are no orbs in hers – however, they seem to be having a party in mine. Of course Notre Dame is an ancient building and there were lots of people there that day, stirring up dust. Still, I wonder. I’ve written a couple of other posts about orbs – interesting how they show up in some photos and not others.

As usual, my Thursday door is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors Challenge. So pop on over and check out the other doors from around the world, or add one of your own.

 

 

29 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Notre Dame, Paris

  1. I love that building. The rose window is interesting for all sorts of reasons, especially as it is such an old one… the giveaway is that the tracery ‘spokes’ don’t go straight up to 12 o’clock, but sit either side of it, giving the impression of cyclical movement 🙂

    1. Oh, that’s very interesting… According to my friend Wikipedia, the rose window was put in around the mid 1200’s, so it is definitely very old. I hadn’t realised that about the spokes, I’ll have to keep it in mind (next time I’m in St Alban’s Cathedral I’ll be checking out their window as well). Thanks for the insight 🙂

  2. Beautiful. I do hope to visit that place one day soon; I’ve heard/read so much about it and your photos just make we want to go that much more. Good choice Helen 🙂

  3. Funny story about Notre Damme…Greg an I were in Paris, got off the train at the wrong stop so we walked around for a bit. I saw this cool looking church and said oh let’s go and see that. As we got closer we realised it wasn’t a cool church, it was Notre Damme lol

    1. Oh, and did you stumble upon a big metal tower and think, that’s cool, as well? 😉 Kidding of course, Paris is a bit like that, isn’t it? Stuff just appears from around corners and you think ‘that looks familiar,’ and then it’s the Louvre or something 🙂

      1. Oh, I’ve never been up the Tower – I’m not a fan of heights or elevators, plus every time I’ve been there the line has been huge to get on (that’s my excuse, anyway) 😉

  4. Those doors look like they could be from Ambeth! I saw Note Dame once years ago from the river bank lit up against the night sky… it was spectacular! Those orbs look like they could be tiny spots of rain on your lense. Its a lovely effect, anyhow!

    1. Yes, I think they might have crept out of my subconscious when I was describing the doors to Ambeth’s Palace 🙂
      As for the orbs, I’m not sure. My daughter’s photo was with the same camera, and there are no orbs. Plus I took another shot and there are still a few orbs there, but they’ve moved. And it wasn’t raining, even though it was a very cold day. I’d be more inclined towards dust for a natural explanation… But then I’m not sure 🙂

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