Thursday Doors – St Pancras New Church, London

IMG_1280This is a side door to the St Pancras New Church, London. The banner in front is an art installation there at the time I took the photo, but I don’t think it detracts from the rather splendid red doors.

IMG_1277The church itself was built in 1819 in the Greek Revival style, and was called the St Pancras New Church to distinguish it from the St Pancras Old Church, which is not too far away.

IMG_1278One of the reasons I chose this door this week is because of the caryatid detail above it, taken from the Erectheum in Athens. It ties in with my Greek stadium post from yesterday, in honour of the ongoing Olympic Games. The architect, Henry Inwood, was in Athens at the time the plans for the church were accepted, and brought back plaster casts of the original statues for reference.

ErectheumAnd here, just for our own reference, is the Erectheum in Athens, part of the temple complex on the Acropolis. I took this photo when I was there quite a few years ago, and I’m sure it will feature in a Wednesday Wander at some point soon.

This is my entry for this week’s Thursday Doors Challenge, courtesy of Norm 2.0. For more doors, or to add one of your own, simply visit Norm’s blog and click the link.

16 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – St Pancras New Church, London

  1. Helen – I love the art installation and the different views – cool connection to the olympics too – and I am rusty on my history – but in the US – our states capital (DC) I guess was supposed to have an Athenian feel – with chariots and figures – but money issues and arguing came up –
    anyhow – enjoyed learning thru your door post today – πŸ˜‰

    1. Thank you πŸ™‚ And you’re right, as far as I know – your capital was supposed to have a Greek/Roman feel to it, to echo the fact that the Greeks invented democracy, which was one of the founding principles of the US. Also, Pompeii was discovered around the time the Capitol buildings were built, and the discoveries there influenced art and architecture around the world. Really pleased you enjoyed the post, thanks for commenting! πŸ™‚

    1. Oh, I don’t know! I’ll see if my old friend Google throws anything up. There’s the old ‘oranges and lemons’ song, which has a lot of the church bells of London, but doesn’t include St Pancras. Let me know if you remember it πŸ™‚

    1. Thanks Linda πŸ™‚ They are caryatids holding up the entablature, which is basically another name for female statues wearing drapery. The Greeks used them in a lot of their architecture, which is why they are so prevalent in Greek Revival style. At least as far as I know, anyway πŸ™‚

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