Wednesday Wander – Warwick Castle

This week, I’m wandering to a view that I’ve seen many times. It’s of an ancient castle, almost a thousand years old in parts – a place steeped in legend, where kings were made and battles fought, mysteries still hiding in its thick stone walls. This is Warwick Castle.

The original castle at Warwick was built in 1068 by William the Conqueror as part of his strategy to stamp his authority on the newly conquered country. It is situated along a bend of the storied River Avon and, until 1978, was still residence of the Earls of Warwick, the legendary Kingmakers.

Kings, Queens and assorted nobility have all stayed within its grey walls over the centuries, including Elizabeth I, Richard III and Queen Victoria. The castle has been painted by Canaletto, among others, and its collection of arms and armour is considered second only to that in the Tower of London. Hardly surprising, considered the many and varied wars fought on behalf of kings and queens by Warwicks over the years.

The castle is also home to one of the world’s largest working trebuchets, or siege engines. Eighteen metres tall and made of oak, it can fling projectiles as far as 300 metres. I have seen it in action and it is something to behold – it takes four men running in treadmills just to lift the counterweight!

Near to the castle is a lovely park I’ve often visited. It’s home to a funfair and mini golf, as well as lovely gardens and, down by the river, there is a place to picnic and fly kites. Water lilies float serene, as do the ducks and swans, and for a moment you could be anywhere, at any time.

On the edge of the park is a bridge across the river, where you can pause and take in the view to the castle. Set into the pavement is this plaque. I think I would have to agree. 🙂

Thank you for coming on another Wednesday Wander with me – see you next time!


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A Question Of Orbs

A few weeks ago, Hugh over at Hugh’s Views and News posted an image he had taken on the beach which featured a strange glowing orb. We ended up having a conversation in the comment section, as I had also blogged about a photograph in which I’d captured some unexplained phenomenon. I mentioned I had a few other shots in which these ‘orbs’ had shown up, and promised to do a post. So here it is.

I took these images at Warwick Castle about five years ago when the Castle was all decked out for Christmas, so they are very timely. Warwick Castle is the ancient seat of the Earls of Warwick and has a building history spanning almost a thousand years, from the original Norman motte and bailey to the Victorian renovations done when Lady Warwick was a favourite of the Prince of Wales, who often visited.

The first image is taken inside the Great Hall, which, as you can see, was set up for a Christmas function. As you can also see, there are loads of orbs in this image, including a tiny one way up high, and another hovering like a bauble at the lower right of the Christmas tree. There is also a cluster of orbs running along the left side of the image. Perhaps a ghostly party going on? Or just a dusty old castle?

Warwick Castle Great Hall

This second image was taken in one of the drawing rooms, renovated in Victorian times but dating back several centuries earlier. In this image there are two visible orbs, one at the base of the wall sconce, the other by the curtain tie-back on the right.

Warwick Castle Drawing Room

And just for comparison, here is a shot I took just a few minutes later in the room next door – the Gift Room. As you can see, the lighting is similar, but there are no orbs. So I guess I can dismiss dust on the lens?

Warwick Castle Gift Room

All the photos were taking using a digital camera within a single half hour period. So I leave them here without any further comment. Looking forward to hearing yours 🙂